Software Spotlight: Lineform

nano2.jpgIt’s not often that you find a product you literally have to gush over…but Lineform, for me at least, is that product.  I’m a graphic designer, t-shirt designs mostly, and I use Adobe Illustrator daily.  I’ve never loved Illustrator, and I’ve REALLY never loved the $499 price tag for it…but it has been necessary to do my job.

There are several other programs that have tried to live up to Illustrators standards for a cheaper price…and some of them have come close…but have never quite achieved it.

Lineform gets it right.

Lineform is a fantastic, feature-rich program that is worth twice the $79.95 price tag.

If you use Illustrator, or any vector graphics program, and you’re tired of paying through the nose, you need to give Lineform a look.

You can download a 30 day trial by clicking here.

Comments

  1. I have to second this recommendation. For the majority of users, this is a much better vector program than Illustrator.

    The incredibly easy to use interface makes up for whatever features its missing in my opinion.

  2. Jacques Lema says:

    I have to second that. The more I use it the more I love it. I think the price is a bit steep considering the category in which it plays (49.99$ would be more suitable). However I’ll definitely buy it at this price to show my support..

    When you see how Illustrator CS2 crawls on a intel mac, this i a real joy. If you have vector documents you can export them in SVG with illustrator and reopen them with LineForm. Not sure how it works for complex documents, but it’s fine for logos and such.

  3. Potentially very nice software, but be careful with the test version of Lineform!

    Lineform seemed to be exactly what I needed for making a scientific poster last week. Being completely fed-up with Powerpoint (which unfortunately still is the scientific software standard… illustrator is just to complicated for people having other things on their minds than design) I decided to take the risk and started to set up the basic structure of my poster in Lineform. That is, the test version of the program.

    However, luckily I tested the print-to-pdf function in an early phase and discovered a big “unregistered” cross in the pdf! Well, I can’t remember seeing that warning in the opening screen!

    Obviously, I stopped my software experiment and faced my deadline with -sigh…- powerpoint again.

    What’s the use to a test version that doesnt allow you to test it properly? 80 dollar is to much for me to risk, and “maybe this is nice software” doesnt convince my colleages either.

  4. M. Scott says:

    Lineform is great. simple, fun to use and easy on the CPU.

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