Anyone else sick of talking about DRM?

15296_050406_steve_jobs_hmed.jpgYou know, this is always a slow time of year for the Apple online community.  We’re in the place between Macworld and WWDC…in alot of ways it’s like the eye of the Apple yearly hurricane.

So when something happens that might remotely be interesting to talk about, the Apple community (and the tech community in general) tends to beat it like a drum.

That’s the case this week with the essay that Jobs posted on Apple.com earlier this week. The Internet hasn’t shut up about it yet…with every major site and every major studio making some kind of statement about it.

I have avoided talking about it too much (other than my initial post) because I just don’t think there is that much to say.

Did Jobs write it because of the pressures from countries like Norway to open up Fairplay?  Of course he did.

Is the whole thing a play to defend Apple’s stance, calm the waters with those countries, deflect the heat from them, and make Apple out to be heroes in the online community?

Yeah..so what?  The bottom line with the whole thing is Steve Jobs is right.  DRM is broken and useless.  We all know this…he’s just a much higher profile guy saying it.

Lots of companies and sites have responded about it…but the fact of the matter is that nothing is going to change right now.  EMI is thinking about letting some DRM free music loose in the wild, and that’s a great thing.  Here’s hoping it is successful for them.

Either way, DRM is virus on digital content that needs to be eradicated.  Hopefull Apple will help make that happen.

Comments

  1. EMI will probably release some songs to promote an artist. I doubt they’ll do it with a back catalog.

    Also, iTunes plays DRM free music you rip from your cds.

    I don’t understand why countries are blaming Apple for DRM and Apple wanting to control their product.

    If music companies sell DRM free music they’ll work on an iPod.. and they do, on CDs.

    I think the reason that music companies are losing money is that they’re bloated companies that overcharge for their products. Back in the 80′s CDs were 17-19 bucks and they said once the tech was adopted the prices would come down. 20 years later…

    They would sell alot more CDs if they dropped the prices to $10-12.

    It costs nothing to distribute digital files… other than digital infrastructure.

    The music industry has created the beast.

  2. Yes. Im sick too.

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